Posts

100 Things #93: Group and Batch Processing of Data Curves

Group and Batch Processing is a really neat feature in SoundCheck that saves huge amounts of time when processing data. Curves, values and waveforms can be grouped and processed together, and the analysis, post processing or statistics runs almost as quickly as on a single piece of data. This can be done during a sequence, or offline with previously collected data. It even extends to imported data – for example, if you want to run a POLQA analysis on a batch of recordings made in a different system, you can simply import the wav files and calculate scores for hundreds or even thousands of waveforms all at once.

Save Time Processing Data with Group and Batch Processing

Learn more

Read our Knowledgebase Article on using batch processing.

Learn more about the POLQA module in SoundCheck (video contains a demo of batch processing).

 

Video Script:

Audio test and measurement involves collecting and analyzing a lot of data. You might have multiple inputs and outputs, or you need to collect data not just once but over and over again. Perhaps you’re averaging measurements on a single unit over multiple runs, or testing multiple units in a production facility. Handling and processing all this data efficiently, in realtime, can be complex.

SoundCheck processes large groups of data quickly and easily with its group and batch processing capabilities. Curves, values and waveforms are grouped and processed together, and the analysis, post processing or statistics runs almost as quickly as on a single piece of data.

This is useful, for example, if you’re repeating a series of sequence steps on a single device, to calculate the deviation in its response at various positions, or if you’re averaging sensitivity values of a batch of 15 microphones for a spec sheet.

Groups of data can be analyzed and processed either within a test sequence or offline.

In a sequence, groups of data can be automatically created, saved in the Memory List and automatically analyzed together the same way every time the sequence is run. Here’s a simple example sequence where I capture recordings using a 6 mic array, group the recorded waveforms and use a single analysis step to get responses from each of the microphones. The same process can also be used in post processing or limit steps. SoundCheck also makes it easy to keep track of your data by allowing you to append your data names with Signal Path and Input data names.

Data processing outside of a sequence is known as “offline mode” – let’s take a look at an example. Here, I’ll group the frequency responses of 5 microphones I measured previously and calculate their sensitivity values at 1kHz in a single post processing step, rather than using 5 such steps. Note how fast it is in both cases!

SoundCheck’s batch processing capabilities even extend to imported data. For example, if you want to run a POLQA analysis on a batch of recordings made in a different system, you can simply import the wav files and calculate scores for hundreds or even thousands of waveforms all at once.

SoundCheck’s batch processing capabilities handle large amounts of data extremely fast, helping both R&D labs and production facilities to reduce test times. To learn more about SoundCheck’s extensive audio measurement toolkit, check out www.listeninc.com.

 

100 Things #28: Autosave SoundCheck Data to a Variety of Formats

The autosave step in SoundCheck is a powerful feature that allows you to save the curves, values, results and waveforms generated in your audio tests in the format and location of your choice while the sequence is running. Data formats include text, csv, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word, Matlab, WAV, TDMS, database as well as the native SoundCheck dat, results and waveform formats.

Autosaving Audio Measurement Results in SoundCheck

Learn How to Autosave Data in SoundCheck

Check out our Autosave Tutorial (section 8).

More information is also available in the  SoundCheck Manual.

 

Video Script: Autosave SoundCheck Data to a Variety of Formats

The ability to automatically save data in a sequence has been a SC feature since it’s inception. No other audio test and measurement system offers the Autosave options and flexibility found in SoundCheck.  SoundCheck can save to a variety of formats including text, csv, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word, Matlab, WAV, database as well as the native SoundCheck dat, results and waveform formats.

The ability to save sequence data every time a sequence is run is a clear benefit for the production line test environment.  Curves, values, results and waveforms can be saved for each device under test, preserving the test data for future statistical analysis.

Autosave steps are generally found at the end of a sequence, after all of the data and results have been generated.  Step templates are available for the most common autosave formats.

Here’s the Save to Dat autosave step. At the top, I have the ability to select whether data, results or waveforms are to be auto saved and you can see that as I toggle through these options, the memory items in the list are filtered based upon my selection.  The data to be saved is determined by selecting the desired items in the list using standard click, shift+click, ctrl+click functions.

Once you’ve selected the items to be saved, you can assign the location to where they will be saved. By default, this will be your SC data folder but you can also save to any location on a local or network drive or portable media storage.

Below the folder path control, is the data formatting drop down. Depending on the selected format the various options may or not be available. You can see that as I switched from SC format to Excel that many of the options became active including the options to use an Excel template, Axis selection, Layout, Header configuration and Notation.

Test information is appended to the saved data’s name so If I select Time, the saved data selected above will be appended with a time stamp every time it is saved.

The final configuration is for how the file will be saved and file name construction.  This gives the user options to create overwrite or append data to an existing file when saving and whether this should be an automatic operation or prompt the operator with a file save dialog.  File name construction is done using a template format using default options such as sequence name, time. Serial number as well as a user defined field.

For this example, I’m going to use the default template construction using the sequence name and date.  [close the editor and run the sequence a few times, then open the Excel file to show how the data has been saved.

We can never have enough data no matter if we’re working in R&D or production and the autosave step is a powerful Soundcheck feature that allows you to save the data you want in the format you want and in the location you want.  Future versions of SC will include even more autosave formatting options so stay tuned and thanks for watching!