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100 Things #93: Group and Batch Processing of Data Curves

Group and Batch Processing is a really neat feature in SoundCheck that saves huge amounts of time when processing data. Curves, values and waveforms can be grouped and processed together, and the analysis, post processing or statistics runs almost as quickly as on a single piece of data. This can be done during a sequence, or offline with previously collected data. It even extends to imported data – for example, if you want to run a POLQA analysis on a batch of recordings made in a different system, you can simply import the wav files and calculate scores for hundreds or even thousands of waveforms all at once.

Save Time Processing Data with Group and Batch Processing

Learn more

Read our Knowledgebase Article on using batch processing.

Learn more about the POLQA module in SoundCheck (video contains a demo of batch processing).

 

Video Script:

Audio test and measurement involves collecting and analyzing a lot of data. You might have multiple inputs and outputs, or you need to collect data not just once but over and over again. Perhaps you’re averaging measurements on a single unit over multiple runs, or testing multiple units in a production facility. Handling and processing all this data efficiently, in realtime, can be complex.

SoundCheck processes large groups of data quickly and easily with its group and batch processing capabilities. Curves, values and waveforms are grouped and processed together, and the analysis, post processing or statistics runs almost as quickly as on a single piece of data.

This is useful, for example, if you’re repeating a series of sequence steps on a single device, to calculate the deviation in its response at various positions, or if you’re averaging sensitivity values of a batch of 15 microphones for a spec sheet.

Groups of data can be analyzed and processed either within a test sequence or offline.

In a sequence, groups of data can be automatically created, saved in the Memory List and automatically analyzed together the same way every time the sequence is run. Here’s a simple example sequence where I capture recordings using a 6 mic array, group the recorded waveforms and use a single analysis step to get responses from each of the microphones. The same process can also be used in post processing or limit steps. SoundCheck also makes it easy to keep track of your data by allowing you to append your data names with Signal Path and Input data names.

Data processing outside of a sequence is known as “offline mode” – let’s take a look at an example. Here, I’ll group the frequency responses of 5 microphones I measured previously and calculate their sensitivity values at 1kHz in a single post processing step, rather than using 5 such steps. Note how fast it is in both cases!

SoundCheck’s batch processing capabilities even extend to imported data. For example, if you want to run a POLQA analysis on a batch of recordings made in a different system, you can simply import the wav files and calculate scores for hundreds or even thousands of waveforms all at once.

SoundCheck’s batch processing capabilities handle large amounts of data extremely fast, helping both R&D labs and production facilities to reduce test times. To learn more about SoundCheck’s extensive audio measurement toolkit, check out www.listeninc.com.