Tag Archive for: signal paths

How to Check Calibration History

Regular signal path calibration is essential for accurate audio measurements. It’s easy to check your calibration history in SoundCheck. Watch this short video to learn how.

Additional Resources for SoundCheck Calibration

Detailed explanations of how to check your calibration history in SoundCheck can be found in the SoundCheck manual.

Read more about calibration in our knowledge base.

Video Script: How to Check Calibration History

Whether you’re measuring on a production line or in an R&D lab, it’s important that scheduled calibrations take place to ensure accurate measurements. It’s easy to check your calibration history in SoundCheck. Every time we calibrate in SoundCheck, our last Cal date is visible in the calibration editor. This is true for all of our signal paths and calibrated devices whether or not they’re on the input or the output side. But did you know that you can also view your entire calibration history? Let’s take a look at how to do that.

I’ve got my memory list open and over here on the values tab I’ve got my Cal group expanded. If I double click on microphone 1 sens in and drag mic one gain in over here this reflects the calibration I did just a moment ago. Here’s my sensitivity, and this is the current gain value on the signal path.

If I want to see the entire calibration history, I open the mic 1. file into the memory list and now I have access to all of the calibration history with date and time stamps going back a number of years. Now I’ll take these values and drag them over here into my table, so I can take a closer look at them and see how stable my calibration values have been over time.

So there’s a quick look at how to examine your calibration history in SoundCheck. This will work for any calibrated device be it input or output, and in some cases you’re going to have curves available as well, for example, if you’re looking at amplifier or mouth calibrations.

How to Export SoundCheck Sequences

This short video, “How to Export SoundCheck Sequences”, is a must-watch for those who need to share their sequences with their colleagues and contract manufacturers around the world.

Exporting a sequence from SoundCheck instead of saving it packages all dependent files with the sequence. This prevents any errors caused by hard-coded file paths for stimulus files or signal paths that might not exist on a different SoundCheck installation.

Additional Resources for Exporting SoundCheck Sequences

Detailed explanations of how to export SoundCheck sequences can be found in the SoundCheck manual.

Read more about SoundCheck test sequences.

Video Script: How to Export SoundCheck Sequences

When you’re sharing sequences with colleagues or contract manufacturers, or even just making your own self contained backup, you should use the sequence export function rather than simply saving it. ‘Save’ or ‘save as’ works well if you want to make a new version based on a sequence you already have, or want to make a local backup, but if your sequence has hard-coded links to other files, you’ll have problems if you send it to a different computer. Exporting instead of saving packages all dependent files with the sequence, and prevents any errors caused by hard-coded file paths for stimulus files or signal paths that might not exist on a different SoundCheck installation. Let me show you how to do that. Before we start, just remember that the person you are sending the sequence to must have the same version of SoundCheck that the sequence was created in or higher – sequences are not backwards compatible!

With the file export option I can point to the sequence I want to share and export it to a new location. I’ll create a new folder called exported sequence and you can see that all dependent files in my sequence are now copied into the same directory. If I’m recalling different dat files, if I have an autosave template for Excel or if I’m using a wave file as a stimulus all of these dependent files are carried along with the export. Even the calibrated input and output signal paths that I’m using will be added into this directory.

Now, I can simply zip up this folder, share it with my colleagues or contract manufacturers in another location, and when they open up this sequence all of the signal paths will automatically use the files in the folder. In addition, all absolute file paths used in the sequence will be changed to relative file paths looking inside of my exported folder. They won’t need to re-link or reconfigure any of the steps.

Remember to use this export feature to make sure everyone is running your sequence exactly as you intended.

100 Things #99: Calibrate Signal Paths with Any Interface

Calibrating signal paths is a critical part of any audio measurement, and SoundCheck offers the ultimate flexibility for calibrating audio interfaces. Whether you need two channels or sixty-four, analog or digital, each has its own unique configuration and there is no limit on the number of channels that can be calibrated. For example, its possible to have some channels calibrated with a 6-mic array for recording a response, while others are configured to measure motor vibration and RPM speed. Not only can you mix different devices, but each channel can be calibrated using different audio drivers so it’s no problem to combine something like a Bluetooth headset with analog ear simulators and a digital wav file. Learn more in this short video.

Calibrating Audio Signal Paths

 

Learn More About Calibrating Signal Paths in SoundCheck

Check out our calibration tutorials (section 2)

Read more about recommended audio interfaces to use with SoundCheck.

Learn more about AmpConnect 621 and AudioConnect 2, Listen’s self-calibrating audio interfaces

 

Video Script: Calibrate your Signal Paths with any audio interface

In any audio test and measurement system, your signal path begins and ends with your audio interface. Whatever software system and interface you’re using, it’s important to correctly calibrate all input and output channels to get accurate results

SoundCheck offers the ultimate flexibility for calibrating audio interfaces. Any number of channels can be calibrated, so whether you need two channels or sixty-four, each channel has its own unique configuration. This means it’s possible to have some channels calibrated with a 6-mic array for recording a response, while others are configured to measure motor vibration and RPM speed.

Not only can you mix different devices, but each channel can be calibrated using different audio drivers so it’s no big deal if you are combining something like a Bluetooth headset with analog ear simulators and a digital wav file.

This flexibility ensures your test system is future-proofed and can even calibrate hardware that doesn’t exist yet, so long as it conforms to digital audio standards. Over the years we’ve calibrated USB, Bluetooth, Dante, AVB, A2B and more, as well as the more standard types such as WDM, ASIO, Core Audio and WASAPI.

To calibrate an audio device, you need to measure both the Vp in and Vp out values as well as the latency at all the sample rates you will be using.

You can do this directly from the hardware editor itself. You’ll need an AC multimeter that’s accurate to at least 250Hz, and an adapter to insert it in the input / output chain of the audio interface during the calibration process. Should the need arise for field calibration, that can also be done using this method.

To avoid this step, when you purchase a 3rd party interface directly from Listen, we’ll determine the Vp values and the latency before it leaves our facility. All you need to do is enter the device values from the provided calibration sheet into the hardware editor, and you’re ready to start measuring.

Our own all-in-one audio test hardware takes this one step further with self-calibration. With both the 2-channel AudioConnect 2 and the 6-in, 2-out AmpConnect 621, hardware editor  values are measured during manufacture and stored on the device. These values are auto-populated in the hardware editor when it’s connected via USB, so you never need to manually calibrate these devices. If you swap hardware, the calibration is automatically updated.

To learn more about calibrating signal paths in SoundCheck, check out our online knowledgebase and user manual.